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Limousine Protocol – Help! I’m new at this.

Lucky you! You are going to be picked up by a beautiful, chauffeured limousine! If you’ve not traveled this way before, you’ll need to know a few new things.

If you are a guest, and the company, hotel, or your host, sends a limousine for you, the limousine is referred to as a “car.” Never refer to it as a limo. Since the car was hired for you, you are not required to tip the driver unless he or she not only drives but also carries all of your materials into the hotel or conference center. Limousine drivers have always been kind to me; I tip them between five and ten dollars for local travel. Depending on the length of the drive and extent of service, I will tip a greater amount.

If you are traveling with senior personnel, remember that the best seat in a limousine is the passenger seat closest to the curb. This is the passenger seat that is not behind the driver and where you will seat the senior person in your party.

Your host will generally get into the car first so that the guests do not have to slide over. Should you graciously have to take the seat next to the limousine driver, consider this an opportunity. Having befriended several limousine drivers this way, I now have a friendly and dependable network should I need any travel, city, or entertainment advice from insiders in a number of locations.

No cell phone calls should be made or answered if other passengers are in the car with you. By doing this, you will present yourself as both professional and as an experienced business traveler. Enjoy the ride!

Excerpts of blog taken from the book: Hospitality Management – People Skills & Manners on and off the Job. Copyright © 2015 Lyn Pont, PhD

— Isadore Sharp, chairman and founder, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts

“Pont’s book is a must-read for anyone considering a career in hospitality.”

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